New book on Event Processing and EPL theory

In march of this year, I had the pleasure to publish my second book: Getting Started with Oracle Event Processing 11g

As I learned the hard way, authoring a book is really hard stuff, so this time around I had the satisfaction of working with two co-authors, Robin Smith and Lloyd Williams, both outstanding product managers at Oracle.

Although the book is focused primarily on Oracle’s Event Processing product (version 11g), it also includes a lot of material around the underlying fundamentals and concepts of the (complex) event processing technology employed by the product, so that it should make it interesting to the event processing enthusiastics in general, particularly those interested on learning the theory behind event processing languages.

The first two chapters provide a very good landscape of the market for event processing, along the way describing a few important use-cases that are addressed by this technology. Chapter 3 and 4 describe how to get events in and out of the system, and how to model the system using the concept of a Event Processing Network (EPN).

Chapters 5, 8, and 11 provide a very deep description of Oracle’s CQL (Continuous Query Language). Amongst other things, they get into several interesting and advanced topics:

  • The conceptual differences between streams, and relations;
  • How different timing models, such as application-based and system-based time models, influence the results;
  • A formal explanation of how relational algebra in SQL is extended to support streams;
  • Shows how to implement interesting pattern matching scenarios, such as that of missing events, and the W pattern; and
  • Describes how CQL is extended to support JDBC, Java, and Spatial technology, allowing one to not only process events in time, but also in terms of location.

Chapters 6, 7, and 9 describe how to manage the overall system, both in terms of configuration, but also performance, and how to scale-up and scale-out, particularly explaining how a Data Grid can be used in conjunction with event processing to greatly improve scalability and fault tolerance. Finally, chapters 10 and 12 tie everything together with a case study and discusses future directions.

I hope you will have as much fun reading this book as I had writing it.

If you have any questions along the way, feel free to send them to me.

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2 Responses to New book on Event Processing and EPL theory

  1. Alireza says:

    Alex,
    Unlike EPL, CQL does not support correlated subqueries. Is it correct?

    • Alexandre Alves says:

      Hi,

      You are correct, unfortunately correlated sub-queries are NOT supported; however, you can achieve the same results with nested views, etc.

      Thanks!
      Alex

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